State aid and Brexit: the temptation for political intervention

State aid is currently regulated by the EU and, after Brexit, the government intends to transpose the rules into UK legislation, with the Competitions and Markets Authority overseeing the issue. Totis Kotsonis (Eversheds Sutherland) explains why future governments could be tempted to allow political intervention that EU membership precludes.  The UK government has recently indicated its intention … Read moreState aid and Brexit: the temptation for political intervention

The Chequers plan is devoid of democracy – instead we should seek a true free trade partnership with the EU

Below is the text of the speech David Davis has just delivered to the Hanns Seidel Foundation in Munich Today, I want to speak about relationships. I want to consider the future of the United Kingdom and the European Union, of Britain and Germany, and of Britain and Bavaria. Before I do so, however, I believe … Read moreThe Chequers plan is devoid of democracy – instead we should seek a true free trade partnership with the EU

What is secondary legislation and why do we have it?

Many who voted for Brexit did so to ‘Take Back Control’ from the EU, but who will legislative control pass to after Exit Day and what are the possible consequences for our constitution and for all of us? In the second post in our Public Law team’s series Nick Wrightson outlines why secondary legislation is … Read moreWhat is secondary legislation and why do we have it?

How Anglicans tipped the Brexit vote

Two-thirds of Anglicans voted for Brexit, a much higher proportion than in the country as a whole. Greg Smith (William Temple Foundation) and Linda Woodhead (Lancaster University) look at the reasons for the disparity and note that the divergence between the beliefs of UK evangelicals – including the Archbishop of Canterbury – and ‘normal’ Anglicans. The Archbishop of Canterbury, Justin Welby, has been … Read moreHow Anglicans tipped the Brexit vote

After a brutal rebuff at Salzburg, Theresa May must shift Brexit policy and reunite her party

President Tusk’s verdict after meeting with the assembled leaders of the EU27 at Salzburg was brutal. Perhaps it wasn’t anything that EU figures hadn’t already said before. But it left little room for doubt. The economic aspects of the Prime Minister’s Chequers plan, he said, “will not work”. This was a major setback. Number 10’s … Read moreAfter a brutal rebuff at Salzburg, Theresa May must shift Brexit policy and reunite her party

Notes on compromise: joining the EEA is not the same as staying in the EU

On behalf of Scotland, Nicola Sturgeon has urged that the UK leave the EU but remain within the Customs Union. It should seek also to join the European Economic Area on the same terms as Norway and Iceland enjoy. Many others have defended the same proposal. On a free vote, it would probably command a … Read moreNotes on compromise: joining the EEA is not the same as staying in the EU

Mutual trust remains until we leave: notification of intention to leave the EU not an exceptional circumstance

This blog reviews Case C-327/18 PPU Judgment of the Court (First Chamber) 19 September 2018. In short: “Mere notification” is not an exceptional circumstance within the meaning of the case law which is capable of justifying a refusal to execute an EAW. Substantial grounds to believe that the requested person is at risk of being deprived … Read moreMutual trust remains until we leave: notification of intention to leave the EU not an exceptional circumstance

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