Brexit identities play a role in how people view the economy and immigration

There is a divide between how Remainers and Leavers perceive the UK’s economic performance and other policy developments, explain Miriam Sorace and Sara B. Hobolt. A major consequence of this lack of agreement about basic facts is that reaching a consensus on how to navigate Brexit becomes even more complicated. On the 23 June 2016, … Read moreBrexit identities play a role in how people view the economy and immigration

The EU Common Fisheries Policy failed British fishermen – here’s what should replace it post-Brexit

During the referendum, those on the Remain side defended all sorts of aspects of EU membership, from free movement to the Customs Union to the European Arrest Warrant and the role of the ECJ. No-one defended its fisheries policy. The Common Fisheries Policy, replacing the role of nation states in managing their own waters, has … Read moreThe EU Common Fisheries Policy failed British fishermen – here’s what should replace it post-Brexit

Brexit denial in Cardiff Bay is reducing Wales’ soft power

As part of the United Kingdom, Wales benefits from the hard power projection of the British state. Wales also gains from the UK’s soft power which since the EU referendum has consistently been ranked the second greatest in the world by Portland Communications’ ‘The Soft Power 30’. Wales also has its own soft power assets. Sportsmen … Read moreBrexit denial in Cardiff Bay is reducing Wales’ soft power

The future of the Single Electricity Market on the island of Ireland after Brexit is yet to be agreed on

A great deal of attention during the Brexit negotiations has been focused on the issue of the Irish border. However, as Meabh Cormacain writes, Brexit also has important implications for Northern Ireland’s participation in the Single Electricity Market that currently exists across the island of Ireland. She highlights that despite widespread agreement on the importance … Read moreThe future of the Single Electricity Market on the island of Ireland after Brexit is yet to be agreed on

Article 50 is flawed: could the ECJ extend the two-year withdrawal period?

The two-year time limit stipulated in Article 50, argues Philip Allott (University of Cambridge), is wildly unrealistic: its drafters never anticipated that a large member state would ever leave the EU. In this legal opinion, he sets out how the ECJ could extend the withdrawal period, thereby allowing the UK to leave in an orderly fashion. … Read moreArticle 50 is flawed: could the ECJ extend the two-year withdrawal period?

As the TUC prepares to meet in Manchester, it’s time the unions welcomed Brexit

Hopes for an outright re-run of the EU referendum seem to have faded, at least as far as the TUC is concerned. Not that the hard Remainers have given up on their hope to reverse Brexit or at least delay it. Every trick is being used, including another phase of Project Fear and one or … Read moreAs the TUC prepares to meet in Manchester, it’s time the unions welcomed Brexit

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