We were never going to be able to resolve Irish border issues until after the trade talks

The Irish border issue ought to be very simple. We should work out what trading arrangements we want with the EU and then seek the “softest” border between Ireland and Northern Ireland consistent with those trading arrangements, where a perfectly “soft” border is defined as one at which goods are not stopped at the border … Read moreWe were never going to be able to resolve Irish border issues until after the trade talks

Paul Craig: European Union (Withdrawal) Bill: Legal Status and Effect of Retained Law

In an earlier posting I intimated that the initial divide between EU measures that should be regarded as primary legislation post-Brexit and those that should be regarded as secondary measures would not be too difficult to draw. When the initial divide had been made it could then be decided whether the status of any such … Read morePaul Craig: European Union (Withdrawal) Bill: Legal Status and Effect of Retained Law

Populism fed pro-Leave sentiment, but what kind of populism?

Euroscepticism is an established force in British politics. Did it explain the Leave vote, or was the advent of right-wing populism also responsible? Brian Rathbun (University of Southern California) looks at the correlation between nativist and anti-elite sentiments and support for Brexit. He concludes that a particular kind of populism – one grafted onto a distrust of multiculturalism … Read morePopulism fed pro-Leave sentiment, but what kind of populism?

Brian Christopher Jones: Wightman and How Not to Advance the Law

Wightman v Advocate General [2018] concerns whether it is legally possible to reverse an Article 50 notice given to the European Union. At first instance the Lord Ordinary refused permission for the petition to proceed, saying that the issue was “hypothetical and academic”. Under the Court of Session Act 1988, one of the hurdles for … Read moreBrian Christopher Jones: Wightman and How Not to Advance the Law

Getting the facts straight on the true cost of “MaxFac”

Last month, the likeable Chief Executive of HMRC, Jon Thompson, made waves when he revealed that a future ‘Maximum Facilitation’ customs arrangement with the EU could cost up to £20 billion per year. The largest proportion of this figure (roughly £13 billion) comes from the new cost to businesses of filling out customs declarations once … Read moreGetting the facts straight on the true cost of “MaxFac”

What MPs need to know about trade policy before voting on the EU Withdrawal Bill

As Members of Parliament prepare to debate the EU Withdrawal Bill again, we thought it would be useful to revisit some of our previous work on the impact on our independent trade policy of various arrangements the UK might have with the EU. These are very relevant to the amendments which will be before the … Read moreWhat MPs need to know about trade policy before voting on the EU Withdrawal Bill

>