We knew what we were voting for in June 2016 – the Remain campaign made it clear

What kind of Brexit did people vote for? Almost the entire political debate on Britain’s exit from the EU now revolves around claim and counter-claim about what the majority putting their cross in that “Leave” box really meant. After the EU’s recent response in Salzburg to the Prime Minister’s Chequers plan, it’s the wrangle at … Read moreWe knew what we were voting for in June 2016 – the Remain campaign made it clear

Londoners and the rest: how and why geography divides Britons’ political influence

The extent of discontent with established politics in the UK has been laid bare in recent years. One popular explanation puts geography centre stage, positing a divide between Londoners’ relative contentment and the angry North. Lawrence McKay (University of Manchester) shows that the regional divides are real, accounting for key factors such as class, education … Read moreLondoners and the rest: how and why geography divides Britons’ political influence

What would be so Super about a SuperCanada deal with the EU?

With the Chequers proposal looking more and more like a zombie – clearly dead, but still twitching – attention is rapidly turning to the only credible alternative: what I have been calling a ‘SuperCanada’ trade deal since 2016, which Boris Johnson and Jacob Rees-Mogg are highlighting now, or as David Davis has so frequently put … Read moreWhat would be so Super about a SuperCanada deal with the EU?

A rational backlash against globalisation

The vote for Brexit and the election of protectionist Donald Trump to the US presidency – two momentous markers of the ongoing pushback against globalisation – led some to question the rationality of voters. Lubos Pastor and Pietro Veronesi (University of Chicago Booth School of Business) present a framework that demonstrates how the populist backlash against globalisation … Read moreA rational backlash against globalisation

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