How Europe’s deteriorating peace is facilitating the rise of populism

Results from the 2018 Global Peace Index, a quantitative measure of peace across 163 countries, show that Europe remains the most peaceful region in the world. But as José Luengo-Cabrera (Institute of Economics & Peace) notes, Europe’s peacefulness has been deteriorating in recent years. He argues that this deterioration has provided fertile ground for the rise … Read moreHow Europe’s deteriorating peace is facilitating the rise of populism

WTO option in practice: how a no-deal Brexit would seriously damage key UK industries

A no-deal Brexit would mean falling back on WTO law when it comes to trading in goods and services with the EU. This would result in serious economic damage for key industries in the UK, write Kahraman Altun and Johannes Müller. In this post, they explain what a no-deal Brexit and reverting to trade under WTO law would entail in practice. … Read moreWTO option in practice: how a no-deal Brexit would seriously damage key UK industries

Why the Electoral Commission’s defeat in the High Court matters

The Electoral Commission’s defeat in the High Court today marks an important turning point in their long and changing legal wrangle with Vote Leave. To recap, the ‘Good Law Project’ took the Electoral Commission to court back in 2017 to argue that they had erred in the advice they gave to Vote Leave when they … Read moreWhy the Electoral Commission’s defeat in the High Court matters

Book Review: The Language of Brexit by Steve Buckledee

In The Language of Brexit: How Britain Talked its Way Out of the European Union, Steve Buckledee analyses and compares the linguistic features of both sides of the UK ‘Brexit’ debate, placing these discursive techniques in wider social and historical context. Combining an accessible writing style and thoughtful analyses, the book will help open up and advance the … Read moreBook Review: The Language of Brexit by Steve Buckledee

We can do without Chinese whispers on the impact of Brexit

There was a time when few could even name the Governor of the Bank of England, let alone recognise him from off the telly. Those were the good old days when discretion was the byword and the authority of the position was such that the mere raising of the Governor’s eyebrows was enough to send a signal. … Read moreWe can do without Chinese whispers on the impact of Brexit

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