Some special Brexit arrangements for Northern Ireland are likely – but the backstop was always a questionable solution

Is there an alternative to the Irish backstop? Even before the Withdrawal Agreement was finalised last year this question has been central to the Brexit debate. The EU and the Irish Government have insisted on the backstop as a guarantee of maintaining an open border in Ireland. Although they have pledged to look at alternative … Read moreSome special Brexit arrangements for Northern Ireland are likely – but the backstop was always a questionable solution

Let’s get a Brexit deal now – and address the future UK-EU relationship after a general election

Successful negotiations rely on credibility, something in distinctly short supply for the UK Government currently. The Benn Act, the recent Supreme Court ruling and the loss of 21 parliamentary colleagues have all served to undermine the Prime Minister’s negotiating hand. Meanwhile the clock is ticking. Should the Prime Minister fail to secure a notably improved … Read moreLet’s get a Brexit deal now – and address the future UK-EU relationship after a general election

The Supreme Court judges are oiling the democratic machine, not telling it what to produce

The Miller2/Cherry case is not about judges seizing the policy agenda, whatever the critics of the outcome might say, writes Conor Gearty (LSE). In this decision the judges are oiling the democratic machine, not telling it what to produce. This Supreme Court decision is a telling illustration of why all populist authoritarians need to dismantle the independent … Read moreThe Supreme Court judges are oiling the democratic machine, not telling it what to produce

Alex Green: Our Constitution, Accountability and the Limits of the Power to Prorogue

Constitutions do many things. They distribute authority amongst public bodies, enshrine important points of substantive principle, and cement relationships between rulers and the ruled. However, in a more abstract and fundamental sense, constitutions also tell us something about ourselves as political collectives: they express the kind of polity we embody and the kind of people … Read moreAlex Green: Our Constitution, Accountability and the Limits of the Power to Prorogue

Jack Simson Caird: The Supreme Court and Parliament: The Constitutional Status of Checks and Balances

There have been two competing visions of the constitution battling it out since the Brexit referendum in 2016, which David Howarth described on this blog as the Whitehall view and the Westminster view. The Whitehall view is that the UK constitution, and the relationship between Parliament and Government in particular, is designed to allow the … Read moreJack Simson Caird: The Supreme Court and Parliament: The Constitutional Status of Checks and Balances

Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s statement on Brexit to the House of Commons

With your permission, Mr Speaker, I shall make a statement on yesterday’s Supreme Court verdict and the way forward for this paralysed Parliament. Three years ago, more people voted to leave the European Union than have ever voted for any party or proposition in our history. Politicians of all parties promised the public that they … Read morePrime Minister Boris Johnson’s statement on Brexit to the House of Commons

From burdens to assets, and back again: shifting UK press portrayals of EU migrants

During the referendum campaign, most national newspapers problematised free movement, only to emphasise the economic costs of ending it after the vote, finds James Morrison. Six months on, however, discourses framing migrants as ‘invaders’ or ‘exploiters’ resurfaced. There’s nothing very surprising about an analysis of UK press coverage of European Union free movement which concludes … Read moreFrom burdens to assets, and back again: shifting UK press portrayals of EU migrants

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